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Daily Meditation

Daily Offices

 

monks

 

Eating From the Tree of Life

 

The term “offices” is borrowed from Christian monasticism and the Order of Science practice is parallel to that of the Benedictine Order. The offices are also known as the Liturgy of the Hours and the Breviary. The Daily Offices of the Scientist Order include morning, midday and evening meditation. The Offices may be done privately or with a group. All Order of Science meditations involving reading are called Eating From the Tree of Life, wherein the literature is symbolized by leaves, and the meditation on the reading is life-affirming.

The space used is referred to as the Temple Laboratory. Furniture may include a cushion or chair on which to sit as the Holy Throne; any objects suitable for an Ancestral Shrine, such as a candle, incense, and reminders of predecessors; a Ceremonial Bell; and literature on which to meditate. Any space may be used and no furniture or paraphernalia is necessary, so if you do not have a candle or a bell, you can improvise or just sit in one place and recite the liturgy. All that is required is the meditation.

The practice incorporates the first six steps of meditation: a proper physical environment; meditation posture; relaxation; the Return to Tranquility Exercise and Deep Healing; concentration; and breathing. Visualization begins with the Mind Palace, which is described with the Lectio Scientia, or Scientific Reading.

After one has entered the state of calm one chants the offices and reads passages from the Office of Readings. Contemplation entails visualization and thinking about the passages and asking oneself questions about their content. One then engages the will to establish in the mind the focus of one’s actions in life. The meditation concludes with a period of stillness and silent mindfulness.

 

 

 

The Daily Offices

 

The function or duty of the Science Monk or Nun is merely to continuously read the literature aloud and meditate. The High One, the Immortal Emperor or Empress, sitting on his Holy Throne, opens his or her mouth and recites. The offices should be spoken in a solemn tone, chanted, or sung as a hymn, beginning with the thanksgiving.

 

[SPECIFIC READINGS, PSALMS AND HYMNS ARE UNDERWAY]

 

MORNING MEDITATION

 

“From East to West, North to South, Above and Below, from the beginning of time to the end, we consecrate this temple and the present moment to mindfulness. We give thanks for love, illumination, and all our many blessings. Let us now eat the leaves of the Tree of Life.”

 

  I. Oath of the Order of Science

 

In the name of the One, the Law and the Good

It is my honor and duty to join the numbers of monastics

Of the Order of Science upon the right path.

I renounce all that opposes my natural true will.

I take this oath that I might best serve my true self,

My community and the world.

 

 

[NOTE: Please offer suggestions for improvements on our Scientific Cosmology and Universal Blessing, we would appreciate any corrections or adjustments to make this the best cosmology possible. Ideas regarding scientific observations, composition and poetic expression are all very welcome.]

 

II. A Scientific Cosmology and Universal Blessing

 

  1. In the beginning, from nothing, were divided the heavens and the earth. The Source divided this one universe according to the absolute Law of Necessity. Thus history began, and so shall it end, eternally, returning to nothing. Bless the Void, the One, the Law, the Good and the Cosmos.
  2. At first, the whole universe was pure change, or movement, or motion, or heat, which expanded in all direction to create, at once, space and time. Bless the Solenoid of Existence, the Point within the Center, the four dimensions: line, plane, solid and time. Bless Above, Below, North, South, East and West.
  3. Even in expansion, which is called weak nuclear force and electromagnetism, existed contraction, called strong nuclear force and gravity. Bless the four forces.
  4. Thus the universe was created hot and cold; plasma, gas, liquid, and solid. Bless the four states of matter.
  5. So space and matter were formed, and the chemical elements, and the astronomical forces and bodies. Bless the astronomical bodies and all chemicals and compounds.
  6. In time, earth was formed as part of a solar system centered about one star; its sun. Surrounding the earth was atmosphere, and upon the earth the light and heat of the sun penetrated the sea and dry land. Bless our solar system and all solar systems.
  7. Single-celled spheres of life formed in the sea, and filled the atmosphere of the earth with the chemical element oxygen. Vegetation and animals filled the sea, the waters and the dry land. Survival in a competition for limited resources depended upon natural selection and conscious, mindful cultivation. Bless the minerals, vegetables and animals of the earth and the whole cosmos.
  8. Homo sapiens was born in the image of the perfect child, the ideal person, the macrocosm and microcosm united: with contraction and relaxation, with wisdom and understanding, with mercy and love, judgment and strength, memory and will, with pure awareness and compassion, imagination, emotion, reason, perception, sensation, and a physical body. Bless all enlightened beings.
  9. Energy created Homo sapiens with the ability to learn the Laws of Necessity, to know the true names of real forms, and to choose to embrace the One or follow falsehood and evil. The Laws of Necessity preordained all things, so a Homo sapiens must make decisions, but his or her choices are predestined. Bless all good creatures, all the good people of the world, our nation, our communities, our friends and family.
  10. Humans, like their gods, were, although highly flawed, singularly successful at science and government. Bless the gifts of science and government.
  11. This is the foundation of the Laws of Necessity and the knowledge of the Way, the universe, life, and humankind.
  12. From hence have I come, and thus now, here I am.

 

 

III. The Vows

  1. I vow to meditate
  2. I vow to live in moderation
  3. I vow to renounce superstition and cherish nature
  4. I vow to use and promote critical thinking, logic and science
  5. I vow to cultivate holistic health
  6. I vow to cultivate the ideal world
  7. I vow to honor honesty
  8. I vow to keep obedience to my discipline
  9. I vow to remember humility
  10. I vow to nurture silence and gravity
  11. I vow to cultivate vigilance and patience
  12. I vow to be brave and strong
  13. I vow to show respect to juniors, peers and seniors
  14. I vow to suppress envy
  15. I vow to reject contention
  16. I vow to cultivate universal love and compassion
  17. I vow to hate no one
  18. I vow to practice the Golden Rule or treat others as they want to be treated
  19. I vow to promote and defend universal human rights
  20. I vow to challenge individual, group & institutionalised breaches of ethics & justice
  21. I vow to perform my civic duties and responsibilities to the best of my ability
  22. I vow to adhere to the by-laws of my monastery
  23. I vow to obey the Constitution of the mother abbey
  24. I vow to follow the Rule of the Order of Science

 

 

“A reading from… (title).”

Insert Reading, Chant or Hymn

“So mote it be (or ‘Amen,’ or ‘Giving thanks,’ or preferred final phrase.)”

 

 

 

NOON MEDITATION

 

“From East to West, North to South, Above and Below, from the beginning of time to the end, we consecrate this temple and the present moment to mindfulness. We give thanks for love, illumination, and all our many blessings. Let us now eat the leaves of the Tree of Life.”

 

II. The Functions of the Microcosm for Meditation

 

The Twelve Major Organ Systems

 

1. Nervous System

  • Brain, spinal cord, nerves, ganglia
    • Transmits messages between the brain, spinal cord, and other parts of the body, controls and coordinates the body

 

2. Endocrine System

  • Glands, gonads (testes or ovaries), pancreas
    • Produces hormones that regulate the functions of the body

 

3. Respiratory System

  • Respiratory tract: nasal cavities, sinuses, pharynx, larynx, trachea, bronchi, bronchioles, alveoli, lungs, diaphragm, ribcage (thorax)
    • Exchanges gases (oxygen and carbon dioxide) between the lungs and the atmosphere

 

4. Digestive System

  • Mouth, pharynx, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, liver, gall bladder, pancreas, rectum
    • Turns food into nutrients

 

5. Urinary/Excretory System

  • Skin, lungs, kidneys, urinary bladder, ureter, urethra, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, biliary system, integumentary system
    • Removes waste products of metabolism from body

 

6. Circulatory System

  • Heart, blood vessels, blood
    • Circulates blood to regulate temperature, fights disease as part of the immune system, transports nourishment to cells and carry away waste.

 

7. Lymphatic System

  • Lymphatic vessels, lymph, lymphocytes
    • Transports plasma from the interstitial fluid to the blood, fights disease as part of the immune system

 

8. Fascia

  • Fibrous connective tissue
    • Joins, stabilizes, encompasses, and divides muscles and internal organs

 

9. Skeletal System

  • Upper and lower extremities, pelvis, spinal column, ribs and sternum, skull
    • Shapes and supports the body, protects the organs, forms blood and stores minerals

 

10. Muscular System

  • Involuntary muscles, voluntary muscles
    • Shapes posture, produces body heat, carries out movement

 

11. Integumentary System

  • Epidermis, dermis, sweat glands, oil glands
    • Regulates body temperature; holds water inside the body; protects the body from the environment; eliminates waste; synthesizes vitamin D; feels sensation, temperature, pressure, and pain

 

12. Reproductive System

  • Female – Uterus, Fallopian tubes, ovaries, cervix, vagina
  • Male – Scrotum, testicles, accessory glands, penis, epididymis, vas deferens, semen, sperm
    • Reproduces the organism

 

 

The Twelve Life Functions and the Major Organ Systems

 

  1. Ingestion: receiving food for nutrition… Digestive System
  2. Digestion: breaking down food… Digestive System
  3. Assimilation: transmutation of digested food into living tissue… Digestive System
  4. Synthesis: building new tissue… Digestive System
  5. Transport: conveyance of nutrients into cells and waste or toxins out of cells… Circulatory System
  6. Respiration: breaking down nutrients from the air… Respiratory System
  7. Excretion: removing waste from an organism… Urinary System
  8. Secretion: creation and release of hormones… Endocrine System
  9. Growth: enlargement of an organism… Skeletal System
  10. Movement: movement of parts or the whole organism… Muscular System
  11. Regulation: ability of an organism to respond to its environment to maintain balance (homeostasis)… Nervous System
  12. Reproduction: production of offspring… Reproductive System

 

 

The Twelve Holistic Functions and Related Major Organ Systems

 

  1. Protection… endocrine, nervous, integumentary systems, nails, hair
  2. Support… skeletal system, muscular system, fascia
  3. Energy… respiratory, urinary, digestive and circulatory systems
  4. Action… endocrine system
  5. Purification… respiratory, urinary, digestive and circulatory systems
  6. Healing… lymphatic system
  7. Sense… nervous system
  8. Truth… nervous system
  9. Love… reproductive, endocrine and nervous systems
  10. Reproduction… reproductive system
  11. Balance… homeostasis
  12. Wholeness… homeostasis, endocrine and nervous systems

 

 

II. Oath of the Order of Science

 

In the name of the One, the Law and the Good

It is my honor and duty to join the numbers of monastics

Of the Order of Science upon the right path.

I renounce all that opposes my natural true will.

I take this oath that I might best serve my true self,

My community and the world.

 

 

III. The Five Steps of Scientific Method

 

  1. OBSERVE: Scientists first make an observation.
  2. HYPOTHESIZE: A scientific hypothesis is formed based on observations and facts. A hypothesis is a testable and falsifiable explanation of natural phenomena made through observation and experimentation under controlled conditions. When controlled conditions are impossible or impractical, scientific modeling may be used to make less reliable estimates of possible outcomes. The key part of the hypothesis is prediction in the form of if/then.
  3. EXPERIMENT: Scientists then perform an experiment.
  4. ANALYZE: Scientists analyze the data logically and critically to determine the accuracy of the hypothesis and to make further observations. Data and evidence are collected, and when the formal hypothesis is supported through testing and observation, it becomes a working hypothesis. When the working hypothesis is tested sufficiently, a scientific theory is formed to explain the results of the tests. A scientific theory is an explanation and interpretation of measurable, observable facts, based on observation and experimentation by the protocols of scientific method. A scientific law is a description of observable natural phenomena that holds true through repeated testing. A number of hypotheses may be organized to form a larger conceptual framework.
  5. REPORT: Scientists report their findings and invite other experimental scientists to repeat the experiments for verification. Scientific theories may be modified or rejected with new evidence and subsequent more accurate explanations of the observed natural phenomena. Theories are often used to put information to practical use.

 

 

“A reading from… (title).” 

Insert Reading, Chant or Hymn

“So mote it be (or ‘Amen,’ or ‘Giving thanks,’ or preferred final phrase.)”

 

 

 

EVENING MEDITATION

 

“From East to West, North to South, Above and Below, from the beginning of time to the end, we consecrate this temple and the present moment to mindfulness. We give thanks for love, illumination, and all our many blessings. Let us now eat the leaves of the Tree of Life.”

 

IThe Theory of Intuition, Logic and Science

 

  1. Science is a collection of theories. The first theory of the Order of Science is the Theory of Intuition, Logic and Science. This theory asserts that intuition is the ultimate basis of logic and science, therefore, neither logic nor scientific knowledge constitute absolute proof. When scientists find overwhelming evidence for a particular theory, that theory is established as proof of a fact that is not directly observable or measurable.
  2. Because scientific knowledge is always progressing, scientists never claim to have absolute proof of a positive fact. However, scientific method is the most reliable means available to disprove false claims and build an empirical worldview based on evidence and reason, rather than baseless claims.
  3. Definition is the basic knowledge of science. Demonstration is the means of showing the natural laws that encompass all particular things. Experimental scientists design protocols that follow the dictates of logic to determine the accuracy of hypotheses. Then they test their hypotheses in order to form theories about natural laws.
  4. Human beings are biased for many reasons and bias skews observation and often causes injury when the false information motivates decision-making and behavior. Scientific method works toward the elimination of the biases of the scientific community through objective definitions, well designed repeatable experiments and critical peer review.
  5. Various experimental frameworks define different meditations or hypotheses. Everyone can train to perform this class of experiment. Like other scientists, Order of Science members may design mathematical, logical or visual models to represent observed phenomena and generate new hypotheses.
  6. An observer is defined as a sentient being that perceives a thing. The first enlightened observation is the observation of an observer. Therefore, the first enlightened hypothesis is that an observer exists. The first enlightened experiment is to repeat the test of the existence of an observer, thru the feedback of self-awareness: the scientist remains still and silent and observes her or his own awareness. Order of Science hypotheses, the methods of meditation, usually include, and always support, this process of self-awareness.
  7. Effective exercises that include movement, sound and the other paraphernalia of ritual add to the data. Analysis of the data, using logic, provides evidence (self-evident truth) that the only thing able to pose a question, i.e., “does an observer exist?” is an observer. Where there is a question about the existence of an observer, an observer exists to ask that question.

 

 

II. Outline of the Philosophy of Science

 

  • Metaphysics/ Theology
  • Logic
  • The Sciences:
    •  Mathematics
      •  Arithmetic
      • Algebra
      • Geometry
      • Trigonometry
      • Calculus: Dynamics (stable, periodic, chaotic)
      • Topography
    •  Physics
    • Chemistry
    • Astronomy
    • Climatology/ Meteorology
    • Geology/ Earth Resources
    • Biology
    • Anthropology/ Sociology
    • History/ Political Science/ Economics
    • Ethics
    • Anatomy/ Physiology/ Psychology/ Medicine
    • MetaHub (Scientific Holistic Taxonomy)
  • Symbolism, Meditation and Ritual
  • Rhetoric
  • Story of the Cosmos
  • Story of Life in the Cosmos
  • Philosophy of Science
  • Scientific Philosophy of Life and Ideal
  • Goals and Schedule
  • Scientific Human Law and Government (Including Universal Human Rights)

 

 

III. Oath of the Order of Science

 

In the name of the One, the Law and the Good

It is my honor and duty to join the numbers of monastics

Of the Order of Science upon the right path.

I renounce all that opposes my natural true will.

I take this oath that I might best serve my true self,

My community and the world.

 

 

“A reading from… (title).” 

Insert Reading, Chant or Hymn

“So mote it be (or ‘Amen,’ or ‘Giving thanks,’ or preferred final phrase.)”

“In the name of the One, the Law and the Good, we give thanks.”

 

 

 

Readings, Psalms and Hymns

 

At this time the Order of Science is organizing the yearly cycle of readings for Lectio Scientia and the Daily Offices (the Office of Readings), as well as the weekly cycle of readings, psalms and hymns (the Breviary Weekly Cycle). Until these are established, appropriate readings ought to be chosen from the Order of Science Devotional Calendar, Lectio Scientia section, and practiced before the office or meditation.

 

 

Order of Science Devotional Calendar

 

The Breviary Weekly Cycle

The Office of Readings

 

UNDER CONSTRUCTION

 

 

Finis